Monday Musings | A Note on the Type

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I’m the kind of reader who eats up Author’s Notes and Acknowledgements. I love reading about the writing process, seeing people recognized for their contributions, and the piecing together how a book comes to be. But something I’ve realized that I don’t appreciate enough is a section I’ve been noticing more and more recently where the publisher/book designer (?) writes a bit about the font type.

I have to admit here that I don’t often notice when books are set in different fonts unless it’s incredibly recognizable or out there (can you imagine a book written in Comic Sans??). It’s something that I haven’t paid very much attention to, but I wonder if being more aware would offer up an extra way to analyze the text or “message” that they publisher is trying to convey with their design choices. Plus, as a trivia-loving gal, I feel like reading up on the “A Note on the Type” sections (and retaining its information) would give me hella trivia cred.

I’ve seen people on Twitter giving shoutouts to these sections, so I wonder if I’ve been alone in feeling indifferent about this up until now? Do you pay attention to the “A Note on the Type” sections in books? Do you think font types make a difference in your reading experience? Do you have a favourite font? I want to know!

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20 thoughts on “Monday Musings | A Note on the Type

  1. tanya (52 books or bust) says:

    I love the Note on Type section. And you don’t seem to get it with ebooks, so it is one of the things i always look for in print books. Just one of those little pieces of history that most people over look.

  2. TJ @ MyBookStrings says:

    I love if there’s information about fonts in the books I read. I think the first time I noticed it was with one of the first Harry Potter books, for which a new font was created. That’s so cool. A lot of research goes into picking a font for reading material. Since my job involves that kind of stuff, I try not to over-analyze when I am reading for pleasure, but sometimes the font does influence my reading experience–in both good and bad ways.

  3. Naomi says:

    I also love reading the acknowledgements, etc., and I usually also read the Note on Type section, but I don’t really get it. I don’t notice the font, unless it’s very different. Like you, I wonder about the significance of it.

  4. Angélique says:

    I do, I’m quite sensitive to the font chosen for a book. If a font is uncomfortable (common mistake: too thin), it bothers me. If a font is particularly nice and fit the theme (especially in SciFi books), I also notice it.
    I don’t remember if you get the note of type section in eBooks, but you do get the particular font they wanted to use. It happened to me once that the font was locked and I couldn’t change it (while usually you can on your eReader, it’s one of the great things about it). The font was supposed to be stylish but it was so bothersome to read!

  5. Blaise @ thebookboulevard says:

    When I know they exist, I get really exicted. I’ve actually had to put down books before because the font style hurt my eyes and a gorgeous font has helped me make a decision. I tend to notice primarily when I see the italics on a book, because italics are noticeably different across font styles (for the most part, to me).

  6. Shaina says:

    I love the notes about the type, too, but I can’t say that I’ve ever been able to tell the fonts apart! Like you said, it’s only noticeable if it’s super out there.

    I wonder if these notes are going to go extinct what with the advent of e-readers… or maybe e-readers will just have to accommodate more fonts? Who knows.

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